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ITF Seafarers’ Trust head takes up consultancy role

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itf karlshoejITF Seafarers' Trust

ITF Seafarers’ Trust head takes up consultancy role

Kimberly Karlshoej, head of the ITF’s (International Transport Workers’ Federation) charity arm, the ITF Seafarers Trust, is to step down from her post and take on a consultancy role there.

ITF general secretary Steve Cotton commented: 'Kimberly came to the Trust at the end of 2014, after having worked for a number of years as director and programme officer of the TK Foundation and as a consultant to maritime charities.

'During her time as head of the Trust, she has modernised and revitalised it. Her knowledge of, and passion for the maritime industry and seafarers in particular, has made the Trust more proactive in its grant-making by supporting projects that benefit maritime workers, their families and maritime communities in general. Her presentations have challenged and inspired many industry players to work towards improving the lives of seafarers wherever they are in the world.'

He continued: 'The Trust is extremely grateful for the work and effort she has dedicated to the organisation and, although it is sad that she has chosen to resign, the Trust is very pleased that she has agreed to be a consultant for it and continue the good work of the Trust along with the new acting head, Tomas Abrahamsson.

He concluded: 'Tomas was an elected officer of the Swedish union SEKO for many years and has also been a board member of the Swedish non-profit organisation ‘Union to Union’, which cooperates and supports trade union organisation globally in promoting decent work, democracy, fair distribution of resources and sustainable development.'

Foto: Kimberly Karlshoej takes from seafarerswelfare.org
 

Shore Leave Survey 2017

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Seeschifffahrt

Shore Leave Survey 2017

Picture the scene: you're a merchant seafarer, and you've been out at sea for three weeks. You arrive at a US port and you're hoping to spend just a few hours ashore, away from the ship that is both your workplace and your home for up to 9 months at a stretch. Your vessel's turnaround time in port is under 12 hours, so you'll have to be quick.

You have the appropriate visa and permits for shore leave, but there's a catch. There isn't a free service to transport you from the ship to the gates of the port, and for safety reasons you're not allowed to walk. Do you:

  • pay a $75 cab fare for escorts from and to your vessel?
  • pool your money with 6 other crewmembers and hire the ship's service to a nearby mall for $200?
  • hope your ship has paid the $450 terminal charge for you to cross the dock for shore leave?
  • wait for a port chaplain to come to collect you, glad that the ministry they provide is independently funded?
  • realize that it's out of hours for the port chaplains, and you'll have to stay aboard ship?

Believe it or not, seafarers arriving in US ports can face all of these scenarios to some degree or another, and they are the ones who are granted shore leave.

Read complete articel on seamenschurch.org
 

Shore Leave Survey 2017

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seamen at gangwaySeeschifffahrt

Shore Leave Survey 2017

Picture the scene: you're a merchant seafarer, and you've been out at sea for three weeks. You arrive at a US port and you're hoping to spend just a few hours ashore, away from the ship that is both your workplace and your home for up to 9 months at a stretch. Your vessel's turnaround time in port is under 12 hours, so you'll have to be quick.

You have the appropriate visa and permits for shore leave, but there's a catch. There isn't a free service to transport you from the ship to the gates of the port, and for safety reasons you're not allowed to walk. Do you:

  • pay a $75 cab fare for escorts from and to your vessel?
  • pool your money with 6 other crewmembers and hire the ship's service to a nearby mall for $200?
  • hope your ship has paid the $450 terminal charge for you to cross the dock for shore leave?
  • wait for a port chaplain to come to collect you, glad that the ministry they provide is independently funded?
  • realize that it's out of hours for the port chaplains, and you'll have to stay aboard ship?

Believe it or not, seafarers arriving in US ports can face all of these scenarios to some degree or another, and they are the ones who are granted shore leave.

Read complete articel on seamenschurch.org
 

Leben auf engstem Raum

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containershipSeeschifffahrt

Leben auf engstem Raum : Das Leben an Bord kann Seeleute psychisch extrem belasten

Peter Geitmann ist lange zur See gefahren. Er kennt deshalb den Mythos des gestandenen Seemanns, der mit seinen breiten Schultern alles ertragen kann. „Seeleute, die sich für den Beruf entscheiden, wissen natürlich, worauf sie sich einlassen“, räumt Geitmann ein, der inzwischen Schifffahrtssekretär der Gewerkschaft Verdi ist. Aber von ihnen werde oft mehr abverlangt, als sie seelisch verkraften könnten –

Gesamten Artikel auf shz.de lesen ©2017
Foto: By Huhu Uet - Own work, CC BY 3.0
 

Nur ein paar Minuten für den Arzt

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Im Hamburger Hafen

Nur ein paar Minuten für den Arzt

Seeleute haben kaum Zeit, zum Arzt zu gehen. Die Liegezeiten der Schiffe sind so knapp kalkuliert, dass die Gesundheit oft erst zum Thema wird, wenn es nicht mehr geht. Im Hafen Hamburg wird deshalb eng zusammengearbeitet.

Gesamten Artikel der NZZ lesen
 

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